Online ADHD Rating Scales

We recognize that every ADHD evaluation and each plan of care is unique for every Client. That's why we have developed DefiniPoint to help you tailor your assessments to meet the specific needs of your Clients. DefiniPoint offers a variety of  psychometrically-validated and well-accepted standardized ADHD rating scales based on DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

We have carefully selected widely used and accepted instruments that are suitable for children, adolescents, and adults.  These instruments can be used for initial evaluations and on a routine-basis to quantify treatment efficacy and document outcomes.

The ADHD Rating Scales offered in DefiniPoint are well-established and among the most widely used in clinical practice today.  In fact, almost 200 clinical research studies in the last five years* have used these rating scales.

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These ADHD rating scales include all 18 DSM-5 symptom criteria for Hyperactivity/Impulsivity and Inattention.  To see how other popular rating scales compare, click here.  

On-Demand Webinars on the Clinical Benefits of DefiniPoint and Using DefiniPoint in Practice describe the assessment instruments available and their use in clinical practice.

Compare and Integrate Results

A challenging, but important, aspect of utilizing rating scales is the ability to compare the results from multiple informants. DefiniPoint allows the direct comparison of informants' observations at varying levels of detail. Additionally, DefiniPoint enables the results from multiple rating scales to be integrated into a single score.  Clinical research has shown that classification accuracy of ADHD rating scales can be improved by integrating results into a single score. This is described in more detail in the Clinical Framework section.

Sample Integrated Report

Instruments Available in DefiniPoint

Instrument Table 160210

An Overview of Instruments Can be Downloaded Here

Child/Adolescent ADHD Rating Scales

Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Rating Scales (6-12 years) 

Details with References & Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Reports

The Vanderbilt ADHD Rating Scales (VADRS) are based on DSM-5 criteria for ADHD diagnosis and include versions specific for parents and teachers. These psychometrically sound measures are easily accessible and simple to interpret. ADHD symptom-specific rating scales effectively discriminate between children with and without ADHD, and accurately predict presentation specifiers (subtypes). 

The psychometric properties and clinical utility of both the parent and teacher versions have been demonstrated in studies and described in multiple journal articles since the introduction of the teacher rating scale in 1998 and the parent rating scale in 2003. The Vanderbilt was selected for use by the American Academy of Pediatrics in their ADHD Tool Kit and screens for difficulties that often accompany ADHD, in addition to core ADHD symptoms.  The psychometric properties and clinical utility for both rating scales were reconfirmed via recent clinical studies and published in 2013.

The Vanderbilt scales are specifically designed to obtain follow-up ratings from parents and teachers, making it easy to monitor the ongoing effectiveness of treatment(s) a child is receiving. This important aspect of ADHD management that is so difficult to accomplish with paper and pencil rating scales becomes easy for you to automate with DefiniPoint.

The VADRS have been found to be reliable and well validated with normative data available across sex and age (sample size of 6,591 and 6,171 for the teacher and parent rating scales, respectively).

The Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP) Rating Scale (6-18 years)

Details with References & Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Reports

The SNAP Rating Scale, based on DSM-5 criteria for ADHD, is psychometrically sound, easily accessible and simple to interpret. This comprehensive (90 item) ADHD rating scale effectively discriminates between children with and without ADHD, and accurately predicts subtypes (inattention, hyperactivity/ impulsivity and combined). The SNAP is particularly helpful in making a differential diagnosis and includes items to gauge other DSM-5 disorders. 

The psychometric properties and clinical utility of the SNAP has been demonstrated in multiple studies since its introduction in 2001. Response to treatment and direct classroom observation have established the validity of SNAP.  The SNAP was the ADHD rating scale used in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA Study), the largest and most comprehensive ADHD treatment study ever conducted. The SNAP has been found to be reliable and well validated with normative data available from parents (N = 1,613) and teachers (N = 1,205).

The Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behavior (SWAN) Rating Scale

Details with References & Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Reports

The Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD symptoms and Normal behavior rating scale (SWAN) is based on DSM-5 criteria for ADHD diagnosis measuring inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behaviors. The SWAN is a revised version of the SNAP, in which wording of the 18 ADHD symptoms was adapted to measure positive attention and impulse regulation behaviors in the normal population. Psychometrically identical to the original SWAN and SNAP, this updated SWAN short has the same distribution of individuals. The SWAN short is psychometrically sound, easier for informants to use, and simple to interpret. This ADHD symptom-specific rating scale effectively discriminates between children with and without ADHD, and accurately predicts presentation specifiers (subtypes). 

The psychometric properties and clinical utility of the SWAN has been demonstrated in studies and described in multiple journal articles since its initial introduction. Recent clinical studies reconfirmed the findings.

Adult ADHD Rating Scales

 
Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS, Adolescents & Adults)

Details with References & Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

The Wender Utah ADHD Rating Scale (WURS) is based on DSM criteria for ADHD diagnosis and is easily accessible and simple to interpret. This ADHD symptom-specific rating scale effectively discriminates between adults/adolescents with and without ADHD. 

The WURS is a 61-item retrospective self-report scale where individuals rate the severity of ADHD symptoms experienced when they were children using a 5-point Likert scale. It measures symptoms in seven categories:

For adults, WURS has been shown to be a valid retrospective screening and dimensional measure of childhood ADHD symptoms to replicate and correlate with Connors Abbreviated Parent and Teacher Questionnaire and demonstrate internal consistency reliability and to exhibit good construct validity. The WURS may be particularly useful if the clinician wishes to assess possible mood liability symptoms of ADHD. The WURS has been shown to demonstrate good psychometric properties for ADHD assessments for various populations such as college students, men and women, and numerous non-US countries. 

The psychometric properties and clinical utility of the WURS has been demonstrated in studies and described in multiple journal articles since its introduction in 1993.

Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS, >18 years old)

Sample Report

The Adult ADHD Self-Report Rating Scale (ASRS) is an 18-item self-report scale based on the DSM ADHD criteria reworded to be more appropriate for adults or adolescents. Additionally, a context basis of symptoms is provided. The scale is intended to be used for individuals at risk for having ADHD, whether secondary to presenting symptoms, family history, or comorbidity. The ASRS is psychometrically sound, easily accessible and simple to interpret. This ADHD symptom-specific rating scale effectively discriminates between adults/adolescents with and without ADHD, and accurately predicts presentation specifiers (subtypes). 

The psychometric properties and clinical utility of the ASRS have been demonstrated in multiple clinical studies and described in journal articles since its introduction in 2005.

Comorbidity Screening

Weiss ADHD Comorbid Screen (WACS)

Detailed Description with Items (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

The WACS is a screening tool that helps practitioners to gather symptom information about conditions that are most typically associated with ADHD. It is a way to direct and check mental status, and assure that you have not missed comorbid disorders, either by forgetting to ask or because the patient was disinclined to reveal the problem. The WACS can be used with children, adolescents, and adults to provide comparative informant information, information over time, and assistance with differential diagnosis and comorbidity.

By allowing clinicians to visually scan the responses and easily identify endorsed items, it is a user friendly clinical tool that enables the clinician to focus the clinician interview to make a correct DSM-5 diagnosis and to compare what informants describe, with what appears in the interview to cross check differences and obtain a consensus. The WACS is consistent with DSM-5, but is not a DSM-5 checklist.

Impairment Rating Scales

Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale (WFIRS)

Details with References & Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scales (WFIRS) assesses symptoms and to what degree an individual's behavior or emotional problems impact various clinically-relevant domains of functioning. Although ADHD symptoms and actual impairment are distinct concepts, it is informative to measure both since some patients are highly symptomatic but not impaired or vice versa. The WFIRS contains items that are most likely to represent the patient's target of treatment and therefore has utility when used to assess treatment efficacy. The WFIRS is designed to determine not only if the ADHD has improved, but if the patient's functional difficulties are also better. 

The WFIRS is psychometrically sound, easily accessible and simple to interpret. The clinical utility of the WFIRS has been demonstrated in multiple clinical studies and described in journal articles since its introduction. 

The instrument has been translated into 18 languages, used in many studies, and psychometrically validated.

Impairment Rating Scale (IRS)

Details with References & Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

The Impairment Rating Scale (IRS) is a multidimensional measure that assesses functioning across domains. Specifically, the IRS qualifies and quantifies impairment present in a child's life, both in school and nonschool settings. The scale has Parent and Teacher versions which ask about the degree to which the child has problems that warrant treatment, intervention, or special services in specific areas of functioning. For children ages 4 through 12, the IRS has shown good psychometric properties and has empirically derived cutoff points. 

The IRS asks the informant to respond using a 7-point scale that ranges from "No problem; definitely does not need treatment or special services" to "Extreme problem; definitely needs treatment or special services." The IRS exhibits concurrent, discriminant, and convergent validity, and acceptable levels of temporal stability. The IRS is psychometrically sound, easily accessible and simple to interpret. The clinical utility of the IRS has been demonstrated in multiple clinical studies and described in journal articles since its introduction.

The IRS measures the following areas of functioning:

Treatment Monitoring

Rabiner ADHD Monitoring System

Rabiner ADHD Monitoring System with Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

The ADHD Monitoring System was developed by David Rabiner, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and professor at Duke University. The need for regular monitoring of students' ADHD symptoms and performance in the classroom is well recognized. This instrument provides a systematic way to monitor and document how well a child with ADHD is doing at school in several important areas: ADHD symptoms; social and emotional functioning; and academic performance. The form requires less than 5 minutes for teachers to complete and provides clear information about behaviors/performance in the classroom.

Weiss Teacher Report of School Functioning

Details with Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

The Teacher Report of School Functioning was developed by Margaret Weiss, MD, PhD, a child psychiatrist and professor at the University of British Columbia, and provides clinicians with information on a student's performance and behaviors at school as well as teachers' perspectives and concerns. The Teacher Report is designed to facilitate communication between the clinician and teachers during an ADHD evaluation and following treatment as part of an ongoing ADHD management plan.

Medical Monitoring

Details with Questions (full version available inside DefiniPoint)

Sample Report

The need for regular monitoring of patients' outcomes and side effects during the pharmacologic management of ADHD is well recognized. This Medical Monitoring tool provides side-effect information to the prescribing physician for routine follow-up visits. The Medical Monitoring tool asks the informant to provide information on 12 common side-effects associated with ADHD medications. The informant is also asked to grade the severity of the side-effects (none, mild, moderate, severe). The tool has a Generic Version which limits the questions to side-effects while the Parent version also asks about the length of time since diagnosis, length of time using the current medication, dosing regimen, effectiveness, and timing of behaviors and dosing during the day.